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20121202
20121210
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Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)
a new constitutional assembly based on an agreement or on direct elections for a new assembly. >> the president's supporters have also been taking to the streets, this time for the funerals of two demonstrators who were killed in clashes with opposition protesters earlier in the week. meanwhile, the german foreign minister says the violence puts the legacy of the revolution at risk. m e to pose a political powers must come together in a dialogue. they must develop a dialogue, when it takes into account all elements of society. >> so far, the call is not being heated. the main opposition groups have rejected offers of talks on saturday. >> for more, we go live to cairo. we mentioned the reports that protesters have broken through the barricade at the palace. how tense is the situation in cairo right now? >> [inaudible] >> a cake, we have to leave you there. we are having some trouble with the line, but thanks so much for joining us from cairo, and we apologize for the quality of that call. >> the exiled leader of hamas has visited the gaza strip for the first time after crossin
election cycle, he was one of the strongest voices this he had would a lost our way -- that we'd lost our way in washington. jim is a kind, sincere man, an individual who is a joy to be around. when it comes to what's going on in america, jim understands that if we don't make some changes we're going to lose our way of life. that's what's driven him above all else, to try to keep our country a place to be place where you can be anything. i look forward to working with jim in the private sector. from a personal point of view, we've had a great ride together. it has been fun. it has been challenging, and i think we put south carolina on the map in different ways at different times, and to people back in south carolina, i hope if you get to see jim anytime soon, just say "thank you." because whether you agree with him or not, he was doing what he thought was best for south carolina and the united states. at the end of the day, that's as good as it gets. because if you're doing what you really believe in and you're not worried about being the most popular and people getting mad ought, then yo
as far as that road that is concerned whether it is the road map to elections as the ambassador was speaking to or a road map for the negotiations between the various disaffected elements in the north of bahrain to renounce violence and engage in an negotiations process. obviously if we get to a point of elections being held and being able to resume assistance with the forces, that will be an important step forward for the united states to be able to directly help the malian forces in addition to other contributing countries. european union, france, others have already begun to really engage with the malian forces, so it isn't as if there is an abstinence of support for them in the intervening period. >> what lessons have we learned, if i might, ms. dory and mr. gast, i think the mission just celebrated the 50th anniversary. we were actively engaged in the training a good thing as a part of the very probably democracy support and in trying to create and sustain a cultural democracy what lessons are there that we might learn going forward about political failures and more on dome
there after the election. he says if there's something worse going on, he can't see it. >> i think there's a marked difference between this negotiation and what took place two summers, i guess, ago between speaker boehner and the president when frankly i thought the white house did a poor job of its advocacy for its own position. this is different. it's as if they learned i lesson. they're digging in deeply this time around. they have the wind at their back because of an election result. it's a strategy. as you mentioned he's campai campaigning today. it's like the campaign didn't end. >> chris, let me bring you in. a lot of people talk about this latest interview with secretary geithner. let me play a little bit of what he had to say regarding the fiscal cliff and the threat that looms. let me play it. >> when it comes to raising taxes on the wealthy, those making more than $250,000, if republicans do not agree to that, is the administration prepared to go over the fiscal cliff? >> absolutely. there's no prospect to an agreement that doesn't involve those rates going up on the top 2% of
. from 1980 until this year when a lame duck session followed a presidential election, every single judicial nominee reported with bipartisan judicial committee support has been confirmed. that's whether it was a republican or democratic president or republican-controlled or democratic-controlled senate. according to the nonpartisan congressional research service, no consensus nominee reported prior to the august recess has ever been denied a vote before now. somehow this president is treated differently than all the other presidents before it. it had been here with president ford, president carter, president reagan, first president bush, president clinton, second president bush, now president obama. none of those other presidents were treated in the way this president is treated. it's something senate democrats have never done in a lame duck session, whether after a presidential or midterm election. in fact, the senate democrats allowed votes on 20 of president george w. bush's judicial nominees, including three circuit court nominees in the lame duck session after the election in
is simply a process. you had an election. he took a bow for their own enslavement and often do. people forget this. they think world for freedom. i'm sorry, but there's a constituency that is per submission. this is a site goes fact of life that is not fully appreciated. in the west. so how do you go about it? to distinguish between democracy and liberalism and you try as best you can to promote the spirit of liberalism, even if it is procedurally at the expense of the brotherhood. >> your response to that? >> i'm listening to this discussion which i enjoy thoroughly, but my mind as to how we do this. and i would throw home one point that i'm trying to stress here that i may agree or disagree with some of the things said. the problem in washington is you look at the democracy, freedom and liberal promotion mechanisms we have. they're actually not as nimble as they need to be. i look at benghazi and answers questions about the talking points, but the bigger policy deployed when he set up is how do we influence the next faith? ambassador chris stevens who is killed to honor his memory. r
just lost re-election and the eight or so seats. on the other hand, he still has a very diverse caucus in terms of ideology and it's going to be very difficult. you'll notice in hiss comments he didn't say no to 37%. that said, if he agreed to 37% and he's basically bilateral talks with the president, who says the kwaux is going to approve that. he could end up with a lot of egg on his face if he agrees with the president on this, they go forward with the vote, and it doesn't pass. >> david, the office of management and budget, omb, asking government agencies to figure out what they would cut if we do go over this fiscal cliff. talking a trillion dollars in cuts over ten years. that would mean furloughs for some federal workers, slower hiring, outside contracting, the closer we get to the cliff, the more real it begins to seem. how does that then change the negotiations? >> well, i think it's all part of the political pressure the white house is trying to apply to the congressional republicans. we saw the same thing in '11 when we had the near government shutdown and the dispute over t
on the egyptian elections. >> good morning everyone. thank you, bob, for that introduction and thank you all of you for coming out early this morning for what i think will be a lively debate. we are going to be asking the question if democracy is to triumph in the middle east, victories at the ballot box are inavoidable and essential. this is the motion we will be debating in the intelligence-squared format per requests from our panelists who have done this once already -- they have had a practice round. they have not had a chance of doing this, but i suspect, had probably had several scotches and talked about ways to defeat their foes. we know that this is a time of revolution in the middle east. it started with a fruit sell seller in tunisia and toppled a 230-year dictator that spread to egypt and the egyptian revolution was concern to the united states. egypt has long held incredible importance to u.s. policy in the middle east. the u.s. reaction to that revolution was unclear. there were some that said this was a good thing that this would only lead to democracy. there were others who in
working inside the elected -- the elected claim ber of the united states stat or better off resigning and becoming head of the -- head of heritage? it was a no-brainer. you know -- >> remarkable. >> financial incentiveta. but it's remarkable and shows you limits in which being a united states senator -- i've talked to other senators who made the decision to try to get into leadership track who said it's no fun trying to be party of one or gang of six or gang of eight. it stinks especially ex-governors can't stand it in there. it is sad that you don't feel as if you can make a -- as big of a difference inside the senate as you can at a special interest group. welcome to politics of the 21st century. >> i couldn't agree more, chuck. frankly i think jim demint couldn't agree more. he said, i'm leaving the senate now but i'm not leaving the fight. i've decided to join the heritage foundation at a time when the conservative movement needs strong leadership in the battle of ideas. chuck, to your point. kelly, i want to go to you. in the midst, and we'll talk about the fiscal cliff in a minu
sharif come in, there's a reinvolving door act, and he returns to power in 1993. wins the election. my father returns to pakistan. >> is he welcomed by your aunt? >> arrested at the airport,s plane -- >> welcomedded in a manner of speaking. >> welcomed as -- as they react to each other, but, anyway, he is arrested at the airport on all the scharnlgs held over from the last period and taken to jail, again, all charges that carry the death penalty, charges of treason. one by one, the cases against him are acquitted in them. , and he comes out of jail, and he starts to travel around the country. he founds a reformed movement, an elected member of the prudential assembly. in quite early on in the regime, she empowers the security forces in the city, and under operation clean up to, quote, clean up the city, and what that means, really is it means whatever the security forces would like it to mean. in the two-year period it's in effect, some 3,000 men are murdered, and in what we call police encounters, which is, you know, a flagrant abuse of language because encounter is what happens when
reason why we are seeing confidence fall. alisyn: do you think the days after a presidential election are normally filled with promise, the promise of better days ahead. there is a high from election? but this with the consumer confidence plunging how do you make sense of it so soon after the elections? >> it was a miserable election. wasn't it. the whole time we had a small conversation. the president ran a pretty negative campaign and didn't win a mandate on big stuff. he did talk about his desire to increase taxes which may go to melissa's point. but after an elect like this. there isn't that goodwill. there isn't that kind of national coming together that you might have seen for, say, bill clinton or ronald reagan and their reelection. people are pretty bummed out. alisyn: tell us what the larger issue is. does this mean people won't be spending as much on christmas gifts in how do it translate to what it means to the economy? >> it's always hard to reconcile how people feel and how they act. we know you may feel like you shouldn't spend a lot of money but when push comes to showf
duly elected leadership are built on more stable foundation this can be substantial but brutal ties the u.s. maintains with the hosni mubarak regime in egypt or yemen. nowhere in the region is the struggle against dictatorship more vital than in syria. over the past 20 months it has become abundantly clear that with assad in power there is no possibility, none whatever, for democratic process in syria. for years syria has been one of the most repressive countries in the world according to the state department rights reports, analytical studies by freedom house. political dissidents were routinely in prisons or disappeared and journalists were silenced. human-rights activists operated underground living in constant fear of the dreaded -- mr reuel marc gerecht 23 -- assad was cast by many as a, quote, reformer but his terrible treatment of his own people should have been a strong indication of what he was really all about. callie government treats its people the true testament to its character. callie government treats its own people in vindication of how it will act on the world stag
that president was in cambodia right after the election. he was in burma. secretary clinton moved widely throughout the region as does secretary panetta. and the amount of activities that i do and my forces do have been a prompt jump in what we've done in the past, and we're looking for opportunities to do more exercise. we're doing more of those things already. i think it's visible to our allies. i think it's visible to our partners. not to be invisible to the region. we also want to jump, where's the next summary our aircraft carrier, that's always the sake of. and we will, over time as you heard secretary panetta said, we will rebalance our navy towards the pacific, and i party mentioned in my opening remarks, we are rapidly moving our most capable assets in the region because of some of the ballistic missile defense will be facing of those types of things. so i think it's not about one thing. it's about a holistic approach, and what if you on the military side is only one aspect of a. it's got to be tied to what's happening in the economic side in what's happening in the diplomatic s
wield in the next election rather than to join together in a bipartisan basis and solve what's broken in our immigration system. let's start here, let's build on this. we can do it today if we can just somehow avoid the objections and to pass this legislation that's been passed by the house. it passes the stem visa bill, it keeps families together, it represents values that i would think both sides of the aisle would applaud. with that, mr. president, i would yield the floor and suggest the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: quorum call: mrs. murray: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from washington. mrs. murray: i ask unanimous consent the quorum call be lifted. the presiding officer: without objection. mrs. murray: thank you, mr. president. mr. president, middle-class families in our country today are paying very close attention to what we are doing here in washington, d.c. they really understand what is at stake. they know that the impact our decisions will have on their lives, and they keep hoping that their elect
interview since the election, president obama rejected a proposal from house speaker john boehner. he spoke on bloomberg television. >> unfortunately the speaker's proposal right now is still out of balance. i'm happy to entertain other ideas that the republicans may present. but we are not going to simply cut our way to prosperity or to cut our way out of this deficit problem that we have. we're going to need more revenues. in order to do that, that starts with higher rates for the folks at the top. >> reporter: the president did say today he would consider lowering rates again for the top two percent next year as part of a broader tax overhaul. the house republican plan envisions $2.2 trillion in deficit reductions over the next decade. $800 billion would come from new revenues but with no hike in tax rates for top earners. instead the plan relies on $1.2 trillion in reduced spending including $600 billion from changes in medicare and medicaid. at the white house today, the president met with a bipartisan group of governors pressing his own plan for deficit reduction. that proposal, $1.6
by the fiscal future. he could be concerned about every citizen in the state that he was elected to serve. his job -- those are his constituents and that's his job. >> look, i see where you come from. we have to think about this in a broader sense. if every state is looking out for itself, there's going to free ride. they're going to engage in policies that damage everyone's well-being over the long term by looking out for their own re-election prospects. these guys are being political rather than looking out for the long-term interests of their citizens, their states and also the country as a whole. rather than sub sid dies development in really dangerous areas. that's called moral hazard, and that's something that's really bringing the country to its knees economically. >> last i checked, you look out for yourself. you might say that's not a great idea, if you're in new york -- actually, no, if you're in new york you're concerned about new york and not about california. you focus on where you are. that's a reality. >> all right. thanks very much to both of us. please let us know what you thi
that has to do with coal. democrat, republican, marxist, whatever. whoever you would elect from west virginia they're going to vote a certain way on coal. and the fact that we now have this incredibly distributed development because of the fracking boom means a lot of different places now are geographically playing. that goes two ways. one way is we produce more senators from the state of west virginia and how they vote. the other is we produce this broad grassroots activactivism. >> look at this last election. why was president obama as muted as he was about climate and about oil and gas and coal production? well, virginia, colorado, ohio, pennsylvania. these are -- >> michigan. >> the way our electoral college is, we only worry about ten states invested in oil and fwas production. >> somes back to the economics as well. i look at my home state of pennsylvania where we had the early stages of huge boom of marcellus shale. hundreds of wells deployed. some companies are down to a couple wells. why? because the price has plummeted. the reason it's relevant to the politics is if this is
! >>> flabbergasted. you can't be serious. i've never seen anything like it. we've got seven weeks between election day and the end of the year and three of those weeks have been wasted with this nonsense. >> okay. >> so how did john boehner feel about the white house's opening offer? michigan congressman sandra levin is ranking member of the house weighs and means committee. you saw the speaker's reaction. they felt this is a nonstarter bringing up the debt ceiling, not being specific about entitlements. what is the democratic caucus' response to the speaker? >> i think he's wrong in this sense. i'm optimistic. i think things are coming to a head. the republicans have a clear choice to continue the norquist stranglehold or have it broken and the consequences, not continuing the middle class tax cut and continuing the wealthy for all the consequences for the unemployed, those who go to doctors and doctors have to be reimbursed, i think in the end the republicans will choose to have the hammer lock, the stranglehold of norquist ended. >> well, some would say that the aarp has a stronglehold on the -
was elected to serve. his job, those are his constituents. that's his job. >> well, look. i see where you're coming from but we have to think about this in a broader sense. okay? if every state is looking out only for itself, what they're going to do is free ride. they're going to engage in policies that damage everyone's wellbeing over the long term looking out for their own re-election prospects. >> wait, wait. >> they're really political rather than looking out for the long-term interests of the citizens, their states and also the country as a whole. >> last i checked -- >> beforehand rather than subsidize development and dangerous areas and that's moral hazard and that's something that's bringing the country to the knees economically. >> last i checked you look out for yourself. >> that's public servants are supposed to do, roland. >> no. in new york, you are concerned about new york and not california. you focus on where you are. that's the reality. >> all right. we are going to hit pause there. please let us know what you think about that conversation on twitter and facebook page. >
on electing and neutralizing i were aiming -- activities and financial technology transfer sectors in the region, cooperative with the western and other allies. uphold the interests of small south caucasus countries when attempting to construct an effective iran policies, which leads to elimination of tehran's nuclear weapons program, sustained energy projects and help european countries and diversifying their energy, by connecting them to energy resources of the caspian sea in central asia region, and specifically we should support and help turkey and azerbaijan, and europe, finalize in the baku project. .. >> for if we continue to neglect the caucuses, this neglect will quickly become maligned, and maligned neglect invariably generates not only instability, but also protected violence. by its aggressive action, iran is endangering the fragile equilibrium in the strategically-sensitive region which is important for the u.s. interests. america should remain vigilant to deter violence, extremism and terrorism practiced by the islamic republic against america's friends and allies in
's an election year and people say things in that process. and now that we have a movie that is actually going to be in theaters soon, i think people will see we didn't come with any agenda at all. >> i think one of the things they're going to be surprised at one of the center characters, perhaps the person most responsible for finding where he was hiding was a woman, the character you play, mya. what did you think of her? >> well, when i first read the script, i was shocked that a woman played a central role in it and then i was upset at myself that i was so shocked. why wouldn't a woman play a central role to it? it helps when your script writers and investigative journalists. three months before we start shooting to basically go to school. >> did you get to meet her? >> no, she's an undercover cia agent. >> was there pressure bringing her to the screen knowing she may be watching your portrayal of her. >> or sitting next to me on a bus. >> she could be running the camera in here. we don't know. >> yes, there's a lot of pressure. because whenever you play a real life person, especially a wom
relationship, i don't think that that kind of thing -- >> what matters is japan does have election on the summer 16th. are they worried about china trying to put together a leader democracy in the region including india because that was his strategy that if you put together things, much more like your when you think, i know you can't in your position talk one way or another about prime minister but this notion about a strategic -- is japan really need to invest in structures that balance -- are you worried that given your experience you have to balance china much more vigorously than you did in the past? >> yes. most frequently you ask question for japanese people is whether we regard china as a threat or a chance for an hour and should is would like to see china development as a chance rather than threat. >> what you think will really happen? >> there is a assumption that china continues to be kind of international stakeholder, stakeholder, international community. international order and they respect the communication with the other countries. on the assumption i think we can wel
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)